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Honors Program

The Honors Project: Plan

Expectations and Requirements for Honors Projects

Students are required to produce a significant project in order to conclude their time and study in the Honors Program. Students develop their projects and determine the scope of their projects during their first, or second, year in the Honors Program. They may work with Affiliated Faculty in their major and/or outside their major, as well as Core Faculty, and the Director or Assistant Director. The first-year Honors course sequence (HUM 107) introduces students to various ideas and issues, and may assist them in identifying potential projects. The second-year Honors course sequence (HUM 207) may help students further refine important problems or questions for their projects. Track your progress in the program with a printable chart.

Honors Project Requirements Deadlines
Contemplate and then discuss potential projects with Core Faculty By end of first year in program
Contemplate and then discuss potential project with Director or Assistant Director By end of first year in program
Contemplate and then discuss potential project with other faculty/staff who may play a role in project By end of first year in program
Proposal includes a complete description of the project (e.g., initial outline of tasks and goals/benchmarks, timeline for how 100 hours will be divided and any expected budgetary or resource needs By end of first year in program
Submit proposed project to HPC and Director By end of first year in program
Submit project progress report #1 to Director By end of first quarter after submission of project
Submit project progress report #2 to Director By end of second quarter after submission of project
Submit project progress report #3 to Director By end of third quarter after submission of project
Submit project progress report #4 to Director By end of fourth quarter after submission of project
Program involved several hour a week over a year’s time (~100 hours) Before results of project are presented
Present results of project in public forum approved by Director (e.g., OIT campus community and/or on the Honors Program website) At least one month before graduating
Submit written reflection to the Director on their project related work and its value to their participation in the Honors Program (e.g., explain how issues were resolved, reasons for particular successes, the benefits of the project and/or unexpected discoveries) At least one month before graduating

Details

Students submit their proposed project to the HPC and the Director for approval during their first program year, but no later than the start of their second program year. Students will then complete the project during their remaining time at Oregon Tech.

Students determine the scope of the Honors Project, but at a minimum the Honors Project should involve the equivalent of several hours a week over a year’s time (roughly 100 hours per student total).

Students will prepare regular progress reports (at least once per academic quarter) for submission to the Director and/or to the HPC.

Students may refer to previous examples of Honors Projects: see the Director.

Guidelines for Project Selection

  1. Before submitting a proposal, Honors Program students should make time to contemplate and then discuss potential projects with their Core Faculty, the Director or Assistant Director, Affiliated Faculty or staff who may play a role in their projects in order to develop a full sense of the possibilities of a fully realized Honors Project.
  2. Honors Projects—by way of their scope—may be civic-focused and/or service-oriented projects. Projects may be academic in nature, for example, to facilitate acceptance into a graduate program, or to try out what further study in a particular academic field would entail.
  3. For students in the Oregon Tech Honors Program, we ask students to consider the legacy of their project: this part of the project is known as the “Clark Question.” Thus, a key question for students to ponder concerns, “What is the legacy for such a project?” (Who will benefit, and how? How long will the project work have an impact on a community?)
  4. Honors Projects—by way of their student involvement—may be done individually, in pairs, or as a group.
  5. Students will produce a proposal that outlines the scope of the project. Students may work with any number of OTHP faculty or staff to produce a proposal.
  6. The Honors Project Proposal should include a complete description of the project. The description should include an initial outline of tasks and goals, or benchmarks, and atimeline for how the expected 100 hours will be divided. Proposals may also include expected budgetary or resource needs.
  7. Honors Projects will be presented in a public forum. Presentations may be made to the OIT campus community, or potentially presented on the Honors Program website. Students will produce, for each project, a reflection on their work and its value to their participation in the Honors Program. In the reflection, students can explain how issues were resolved, reasons for particular successes, the benefits of the project, or unexpected discoveries as a result of their project.
  8. Students will be responsible for the regular documentation of their progress on their projects: the form of documentation for these progress reports is at the discretion of the student, but students are expected to check in with the Director or Assistant Director once per academic quarter, with a yearly report to the HPC.
  9. Ultimately, Honors Projects should provide students with an opportunity to produce work that brings about their time as students in the Honors Program to a meaningful conclusion.
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